Episode Host

Amy Jorgensen

Amy Jorgensen

Amy L Jorgensen specializes in developing a digital presence and consumer engagement strategies for brand awareness and customer acquisition. She has also developed marketing strategies and directed implementation for the University of Virginia, Michigan State University, University of Michigan, University of Florida Department of Housing, University of Florida College of Medicine, Disney’s Worldwide Safety and Accessibility, and a Disney ticketing subsidiary company. Amy is a University of Florida Business Marketing alum and now lives in Charlottesville, Virginia with her Basset Hounds, Chauncey Billups & Priscilla Presley.
 

Guests

Jenny Boone

Jenny Boone writes news and information and assists with social media, video interviews, media relations and student interns as a public relations specialist for Roanoke College’s Public Relations Office.

Previously, Jenny was a business reporter, columnist and blogger at The Roanoke Times. She holds a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University and a bachelor’s degree in English from Roanoke College.

Aside from her day job, Jenny teaches journalism courses as an adjunct college instructor and advises Roanoke College’s student newspaper.

 

Diana Williams

Diana Williams, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities

 

Jim Goodwin

Jim Goodwin, Washington & Lee University

 

Tiffany Broadbent Beker

Tiffany Broadbent Beker, College of William & Mary

 

Lee A. Graff

Lee Graff works with the video production team at Shenandoah University.  In his life he has been a fast food worker, herpetologist assistant, daycare worker, substitute teacher, commercial producer, documentary film maker, news videographer, photographer, and overall storyteller.  In recent years, his work at Shenandoah University has included analytical analysis concerning the videos the Office of Marketing & Communication produce and how (and why) they are watched on social media.  He lives in West Virginia with his wife and three children ages 15, 10, and 5 (mostly because he only wanted one kid in college at a time).